Sunday, December 29, 2013

"Hold The Mayo"

Mayonnaise is not in use in our house any more.

Well, except if a kid comes home and decides to make a cole slaw afater a fashion.

Now, I found this post and I quote:

“Anytime somebody orders a corned beef sandwich on white bread with mayonnaise, somewhere in the world, a Jew dies,” goes one version of the old Milton Berle joke. The joke works on two levels: It may be that the Jew is dying out of horror at a clueless deli patron, since everyone knows corned beef goes with mustard and rye. Or it may be that the Jew is dying because she herself has chosen mayo and white, and therefore is no longer a Jew. In either reading, the mayo critique is clear—Keep your slime off my food!—a protest that critics of the sauce would make ever more emphatically as the 20th century wore on.

...for many Jewish Americans who came of age in that era, the frequent combination of white mayonnaise, white bread, and white gentiles created a lunchroom culture clash in which they were on the losing end...

...Borscht Belt comedians...made the mayo-munching majority a target for gentle ridicule. To Mel Brooks, a Midwesterner was someone who “drives a white Ford station wagon, eats white bread, vanilla milkshakes, and mayonnaise.” Jackie Mason observed that when gentiles first ate pastrami they used mayo, but after trying mustard “they become like Jews”: one look at someone wielding the white stuff and “they say, ‘Yech.’”

...Woody Allen underscored mayo’s goyish qualities in both Annie Hall and Hannah and Her Sisters; humorist Harry Shearer profiled a family of pasty Midwesterners who maintained personal mayonnaise bottles in his 1985 mockumentary The History of White People in America. The menu at Katz’s Deli, Manhattan’s famous smoked-meat joint, bowed to the anti-mayo comedic-industrial complex by warning pastrami seekers to “ask for Mayo at your own peril.”...Despite its milklike appearance, mayonnaise is kosher and in fact holds a time-honored place in Jewish cuisine; Katz’s Deli happily sells mayo-rich egg salad and Russian dressing. Jackie Mason, in an email, hypothesized that the complicated relationship between Jews and mayonnaise was probably a consequence of Jews feeling “guilty over betraying mustard.”

A more fundamental—and deadly serious—threat to the hegemony of mayonnaise would come from public health advocates...By the 1960s scientists were sounding the alarm that eating too many cholesterol-rich foods such as eggs was perilous for the heart...Health anxieties over mayo expanded further with reports linking raw egg consumption to salmonella poisoning.


The only thing I have to add is that during a reserve duty tour, I was assigned to the kitchen detail and actually made mayonnaise.  Into a large spinning bowl, but large, went eggs and oil and we spinned it around and around.  So I do have not only eatuing experience but creation-experience.

During another duty tour, over Peasach, I made my pizza-matzah and they came from far and wide.

But that's another story.

^

1 comment:

Batya Medad said...

This post has been including in the Shiloh Musings: Bo בא Come! Havel Havelim and the Sh'vat Kosher Cooking Carnival.  Please check out the carnival, visit/read the other blogs, link and share, thanks.